Q: Would this plant survive leaves in the fall or would the need to be cleared- area I need to cover is hillside-dappled to full shade surrounded by trees?

Asked by: Sue - 3/14/2017
A: Based on field observation, we suspect that heavy leaf cover would not be ideal. We usually see this plant growing in areas where leaves have not formed a dense layer. Squaw weed or roundleaf groundsel seems to be fairly evergreen and likely needs some light, even over winter. A solid layer of tree leaves could smother the plants. You could remove the leaves in the fall with a leaf blower or lawn mower that is set to mow fairly high. However, other wildlife depend on that dense leaf litter. For example, luna moths overwinter in cocoon form in those leaves. You would be ahead to choose a different plant, such as wild ginger, bluebells, goldenseal, solomon's seal, or wild geranium, if your site is going to produce a heavy layer of leaves.
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Answer provided by: Administrator (3/14/2017)

Q: I would like to plant squaw weed around some trees in a shaded area. When is the best time to plant it?

Asked by: Earl - 12/4/2016
A: You can plant squaw weed year round. I'd recommend March or April--whenever the weather is nice enough.
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Answer provided by: Administrator (12/7/2016)

Q: What flower would work well as a later blooming option to plant with the roundleaf groundsel in a smaller flower bed where shorter plants are desirable?

Asked by: Megan - 4/5/2020
A: Mist flower might be a good option. It spreads, but so does roundleaf groundsel. If mist flower gets too tall, it responds well to being trimmed back.
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Answer provided by: Administrator (4/7/2020)

Q: Is Roundleaf Groundsel deer resistant?

Asked by: Patricia G Schulte - 4/18/2020
A: yes, according to what I've read online. I also saw a patch blooming in an area with a perennial deer population that seems to be neglected by the deer.
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Answer provided by: Administrator (5/11/2020)

Q: how far apart should the pots be placed (Squaw Weed)

Asked by: Leslie Pribonic - 5/11/2020
A: If you're on a budget, plant them about 2 feet apart and mulch them well. If there's no budget, plant them 8 to 16 inches apart. Either way, they will spread via rhizome and fill in the area.
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Answer provided by: Administrator (5/11/2020)

Q: Do birds spread this plant's seeds? How long-lived are the plants once established? Will they persist several seasons? (I know these spread by stolons and that there are two species of this plant and I think the one you have here is the one that is more likely to spread.) We have extensive shade and extensive Wintercreeper "everywhere" here in STL county. The Wintercreeper has never been controlled except by mowing where it occurs and is taking over the world (especially shady wooded areas 'in the back.') I guess I am hoping for a plant that will compete with the Wintercreeper over time and smother it out. ha. (Hope you got a good laugh out of that one....)

Asked by: Jan - 5/29/2020
A: The seeds are wind-dispersed. They seem to be fairly long-lived and persist for years in the right conditions; a patch of wintercreeper would be the wrong conditions, and Packera is unlikely to compete well. Meadow anemone (Anemone canadensis) will grow happily alongside and within wintercreeper, but it won't smother it out (we are out of stock right now).
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Answer provided by: Administrator (6/12/2020)